Industry

What Do You Do Once You Have a Patent?

Patent image from cobizmag.com 

Patent image from cobizmag.com 

Obtaining a patent is great news, but you may be left wondering, what do I do with this patent now that I have it? This decision ultimately depends on your business goals, however, the article linked here gives a great overview of some of the decisions that you could make. For instance, you could decide to go into production and actually create whatever you patented, or you could decide to license out your idea for payment such as royalties. The linked article not only covers these topics, but also offers some of the benefits of each of these options, so read on!

If you are still in the process of obtaining a patent and need illustrations, you can submit a project request right here on our website. Bluebot is always open to new customers and we would love to work with you!

Fashion & Intellectual Property

Image from the patent for Bottega Veneta's "Veneta" handbag. (From: trademarkandcopyrightlawblog.com)

Image from the patent for Bottega Veneta's "Veneta" handbag. (From: trademarkandcopyrightlawblog.com)

With New York Fashion week coming to an end, we felt that it would be the perfect time to talk about the effects of intellectual property on fashion. Intellectual property is a way for fashion designers to protect their creative ideas, however, it is widely known that it is very difficult to, for instance, patent the design of a product, as it may not be considered "novel." However, the products that are considered to be "novel," such as the Veneta handbag pictured above, can receive patents. These patents only serve to help the designer in cases of counterfeiting. Copyright law and Trademark law also relate to fashion and the linked article details how, along with giving a few example cases of how intellectual property rights have helped famous designers to secure their ideas. 

David Bowie & Intellectual Property

Image from Whale.to.

Image from Whale.to.

While alive, David Bowie was a man of "creative genius." Not only was he a genius in the creation of music, he was also a genius in the aspect of intellectual property. Bowie predicted the effect that technology would have on music and he also predicted how intellectual property would be affected by "copycats." While alive, and even after his death, intellectual property allowed Bowie to protect his creativity. His creation of Bowie Bonds- essentially a way to ensure protection of his music- also inspired other artists to do the same. All in all, the protection of Bowie's intellectual property allowed him to continue to be creative without fear of thieves. 

Read on for the full article about how Bowie protected his intellectual property!

Uber: The Travel Agent?

Patent illustration for Uber's version of a travel agent. 

Patent illustration for Uber's version of a travel agent. 

When you travel, do you ever use some sort of travel agent? In a world filled with technology, travel agents must now be up to date and able to perform various tasks that in the past have never been needed before. What better way for a travel agent to stay up to date than for the "travel agent" to be your cellphone? 

Above is the patent illustration that Uber filed depicting how their "travel agent" would function. Essentially, a user could "input their start location, date, and time alongside a destination, and Uber would recommend an itinerary for them." However, "Uber will also organize your transportation as well." 

Read on to learn more about how Uber's "travel agent" would work! 

Kellogg & Intellectual Property

The linked article includes a few famous disputes that occurred over intellectual property. Whether the disputes were over a trademark, patent, or a copyright, the stories are fascinating. One of the stories actually involves Kellogg and what is now known as "Mini-Wheats." 

Here is a quick excerpt about the "Mini-Wheats" dispute: "In 1893, a man named Henry Perky began making a pillow-shaped cereal he called Shredded Whole Wheat. John Harvey Kellogg said that eating the cereal was like “eating a whisk broom,” and critics at the World Fair in Chicago in 1893 called it “shredded doormat.” But the product surprisingly took off. After Perky died in 1908 and his two patents, on the biscuits and the machinery that made them, expired in 1912, the Kellogg Company, then whistling a different tune, began selling a similar cereal. In 1930, the National Biscuit Company, a successor of Perky’s company, filed a lawsuit against the Kellogg Company, arguing that the new shredded wheat was a trademark violation and unfair competition. Kellogg, in turn, viewed the suit as an attempt on National Biscuit Company’s part to monopolize the shredded wheat market. In 1938, the case was brought to the Supreme Court, which ruled in favor of the Kellogg Company on the grounds that the term “shredded wheat” was not trademarkable, and its pillow shape was functional and therefore able to be copied after the patent had expired."
 

Trademarks & The Celebrities That Go With Them

Taylor Swift has multiple pending trademark applications. 

Taylor Swift has multiple pending trademark applications. 

Check out this fun article related to the industry to start your Monday off right! This article depicts some of the biggest celebrities and either their pending trademark applications or trademarks that they have. For instance, did you know that Taylor Swift has pending trademark applications for "This sick beat," "Nice to meet you," "Where you been?," and "Party like it's 1989?" The article also goes into some of the benefits that may come from a trademark, such as having exclusive rights to a phrase that can later be used on "consumer goods." This creates profit for the trademark holder. Click on the link to read about other "celebrity trademarks!"